Potty Training A Child With A Disability

August 22, 2008

Potty training a child with a disability can be even more of a challenge. Here are some great tips to help make this new skill easier for you and your child to master.

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While many parents often complain of experiencing difficulty when they are potty training their children, for most families, potty training is a fairly easy thing to do. Even when there are problems or children show signs of resistance to it, usually they will eventually become potty trained. However, this is not always the case when dealing with children that have developmental delays or disabilities, such as autism, Down syndrome, mental retardation, cerebral palsy, etc. Children with special needs can be more difficult to potty train.

Most children show signs that they are ready to begin using the toilet as toddlers, usually between 18 months and 3 years of age, however that is not the case with all children such as those who have the intellectual and/or psychological readiness to be potty trained at this age. It is more important to keep your child’s developmental level, and not his actual age in mind when you are considering starting potty training.

Let the child show you signs that he is ready first. The signs of intellectual and psychological readiness includes being able to follow simple instructions and being cooperative with your directions, being uncomfortable with dirty diapers and wanting them to be changed, recognizing when he has to go to the bathroom or needs to have a bowel movement, being able to tell you when he needs to urinate or have a bowel movement.

The signs that the child is physically ready to potty train can include your being able to tell when your child is about to urinate or have a bowel movement by the types of faces he makes, posture or by what he says, having the ability to stay dry for at least 2 hours at a time, and having regular bowel movements. These things are very important in your child’s success at the potty. If your child is not ready your efforts will be fruitless.

Things that you will have to avoid when toilet training your child, which will also help prevent resistance, are beginning during a stressful time or period of change in the family such as when you are moving, there is a new baby, etc., pushing your child too fast, and punishing the child for his mistakes instead of being positive will also cause problems. Be sure to go at your child’s pace and show strong encouragement and praise when he is successful because this simply works better.

Since an important sign that your child is ready and what can be used as a motivator to begin potty training involves being uncomfortable in a dirty diaper, if your child isn’t bothered by a soiled or wet diaper, then you may need to change him more often to get him used to being clean and dry. Other children can continue to wear a diaper or pull-ups which are also great for day training.

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Additional Resources:

The Potty Trainer
I can highly recommend the Potty Trainer Ebook. Johanne Cesar has done such a great job in putting a tremendous amount of hands on potty training information and advice in this ebook. You will get a step by step guide to potty training your child.

Potty Train Advice

August 22, 2008

More great potty train advice and some excellent tips on what potty train mistakes you as a parent should avoid making.

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Potty training can be a trying experience for parents sometimes. It’s extremely important to make sure that your child feels like he is well supported and that you maintain a positive attitude toward him if you want to ensure success. Here are some things that you will want to avoid. Don’t try to force the issue. Make sure that your child is ready to use the potty, is able to tell you what his needs are and can handle what is needed to do it before starting.

You should be sure to always offer encouragement and support. If your child refuses to go, because if you start forcing him to go and sit on the potty you will only create a very angry and hostile atmosphere and can lead to more resistance. It can create negative associations with using the bathroom that can be hard to undo later, and can also cause your child to start bedwetting, which can be emotionally harmful. Try to approach this time of learning much the same as you did with other skills like sitting up, walking and talking.

Don’t start potty training during a time of stress for your child. Even good stress is bad stress when it comes to potty training a kid. Marriages, new babies, and during vacations can be just as difficult for your child as a divorce, death or moving into a new home. If anything big and new is coming up in your lives, reconsider potty training until the time is past. Wait until life settles down and the normal flow of life comes back. This will help creates a secure place for your child and helps him place toileting easily alongside other routines.

Don’t set deadlines in the training process or try to accomplish training in a set number of days. Young children don’t work too well under pressure and they certainly don’t have the same concept of time that adults do. Make sure that you are realistic with your time expectations from your child, which is really important if you are looking to potty train an infant. Programs that promise that your child will be potty trained in three days, one day or even 100 days aren’t being very realistic and they are certainly not taking your child’s individuality into account. Each child has his own temperament and brings different skills to the table, so there is no set potty training method for any child.

Sign up for the free Potty Training E-Course

Additional Resources:

The Potty Trainer
I can highly recommend the Potty Trainer Ebook. Johanne Cesar has done such a great job in putting a tremendous amount of hands on potty training information and advice in this ebook. You will get a step by step guide to potty training your child.

Parenting and Toilet Training

August 22, 2008

Toilet training is an important step in parenting. It is your job as the parent to guide, help and support your child in this transition from diaper to potty. Parenting and Toilet Training go hand in hand. Become your child’s teacher and cheerleader when it comes to toilet training.

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Toilet Training: One of the Joys of Parenting

Toilet training can be fun and drama free. The most important thing to do to ensure that the process is easy for all involved is to make sure that your child is ready before you start the process.

How do you know if your toddler is ready to be toilet trained? Well, there are some clear indicators that your child might be ready. These include long dry spells followed by a big wet nappy, being able to tell those around that they have wet or dirtied their nappy, and being able to pull their pants down/ up and sit on the potty independently. Those are the main things to look for. If your toddler is showing these signs then they may be ready. So, it is your job to get the environment ready for them to learn to use the potty or toilet.

If you are using a potty then consider putting it in the place where your child spends most of it’s awake time. That way it is easy to access and you can remind your toddler to use it regularly. If you are using the toilet then consider using a toddler attachment to make your child feel more secure and comfortable. A step might also help your child begin to toilet independently.

In order for toilet training to be as painless and smooth as possible, make sure that you and your child are ready. Some toddlers toilet train quite easily, while for others it becomes what seems like a long drawn out battle. If you are incredibly busy at work, moving to a new house or a new baby is due soon, it’s ok to wait a few months to let things settle down. You might need to be prepared for a few accidents and extra dirty clothes during the process.

Above all you need to make this a positive process for your child. They need to learn that this is a natural thing and should never be told that their body is dirty or yucky. Use lots of encouraging words and hugs to reward your child’s successes. Praise is a fantastic motivator! This is probably one of the biggest steps for your child and it’s worth your patience.

In 1995 I completed my Bachelor of Teaching, specializing in Early Childhood Education. I have worked in education since 1996. I started in Child Care as a Preschool teacher. I have also worked as an ESL teacher and have been promoted to the level Teacher of Exemplary Practice.

I’m a mother of two boys, 5 and nearly 2 years old. Although parenting my two wonderful children is my main focus, furthering my understandings about how children learn and develop is something of great interest to me. I have been doing a Master of Education for the past two years.

I am interested in parenting, as a teacher, as a mother and a member of a wider community. How we look after our children does impact on others in the world around us. I believe I have something valuable to share. I hope you find it interesting and useful.

For more information and articles please check out my website http://www.saneparenting.com

Sign up for the free Potty Training E-Course

Additional Resources:

The Potty Trainer
I can highly recommend the Potty Trainer Ebook. Johanne Cesar has done such a great job in putting a tremendous amount of hands on potty training information and advice in this ebook. You will get a step by step guide to potty training your child.

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